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Candied Seville Orange
Peel in Syrup
Coconut Flour Pancakes
with Lime
Chick-Pea Pancakes with Nigella Seeds and Turmeric
Deep-Fried Egg
Easy Curry
Globe Artichokes
Glorious Green Stir-Fry
Gooseberries with Orange
and Bay Syrup
Goose Egg Frittata with
Potato, Onions and
Piquillo Peppers
Greengage and
Cobnut Crumble
Guinea Fowl with Peppercorn
and Kaffir Lime Leaf Butter
Japonica Jelly
Korean Roasted Roots
Membrillo
Meringue Roulade with Strawberry, Cucumber
and Mint Filling
Mexican Pork and Beans
Meal-in-a-Bowl
Moroccan Kid Tagine with Apricots and Almonds
Pan de Higo
(Spanish Fig Bread)
Pan-Fried Cauliflower
with Herbs and Lemon
Pear and Chestnut Tart with
Rosemary and Orange Syrup
Quince and Ginger Sorbet
Quince Compôte
Rabbit with Potatoes,
Peppers and Lemon
Roasted Squash
and Chilli Soup
Rosemary Sorbet
Rhubarb and Angelica Sorbet
Rhubarb Tart with
Star Anise and Orange
Sea Bass Parcels
with Fennel and
Preserved Lemon
Salted Sevilles with
Star Anise, Coriander
and Chilli
Seville Orange Ice Cream
Spiced Roast Quince with
Honey and Clotted Cream
Strawberry and
Black Pepper Ice-Cream
Steak and Kidney Pie
Strawberry Compôte with
Tarragon and Orange Zest
Sweet Pepper Tarte Tatin
with Black Pepper Caramel
Two-Cherry Yogurt Ice
Warm Salad of Partridge,
Pears and Walnuts
Learn to cook artichokes South West England
Learn to make artichoke salad
 

Globe artichokes

The usual way is to boil artichokes, as in the recipe below. Once drained and cooled they can be wrapped in cling film and kept in the fridge for a day or two. They are best served at room temperature, so give them an hour or so to lose their chill.

Small globes are tender enough to be deep-fried, either whole or cut into wedges. The outer leaves become beautifully crisp enclosing a soft choke-free heart. Plunge into very hot oil and fry for about 5 minutes, covering the pan so they cook in a mixture of steam and oil. Lift into a bowl, using tongs. Add a sprinkling of lemon juice, sea salt flakes and coarsely ground black pepper, and shower with chopped flat leaf parsley. Eat right away while still hot.

Baby Artichoke Salad with Kalamata Olives and Rocket

If you can find them, use small Violetta artichokes. As the name suggests, they are tinged with purple, and look beautiful with the purple-black Kalamata olives. Otherwise, any small globes will do as long as they are no more than 6–8cm in diameter.
Serves 4

lemon juice
small artichokes such as Violetta, 4
rocket a good handful
Kalamata olives a few, pitted and halved
extra-virgin olive oil
sea salt flakes
cracked black pepper
Parmesan shavings

1) Heat a large saucepan of water, acidulated with lemon juice.

2) Trim the artichoke stalks at the base. Pull off some of the outer leaves until the visible leaves are mostly green and purple. Slice the top 2cm off the remaining leaves. Rub the cut surfaces with the squeezed lemon halves to prevent blackening.

3) Once the water is boiling, plunge the artichokes into it. Cover with a heatproof plate to stop them bobbing up above the water. Simmer briskly for 30–40 minutes until tender and an outer leaf pulls out easily. Turn upside down on a plate to drain. When cool enough to handle, slice in half lengthways and scoop out the small hairy chokes.

4) Arrange some rocket leaves on a serving plate, and place the artichoke halves on top, cut side up. Add the olives and trickle over a little olive oil. Sprinkle with sea salt flakes, cracked black pepper and a few shavings of Parmesan.

 

Recipe © Christine McFadden from The Farm Shop Cookbook published by
Absolute Press/Bloomsbury

         
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